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Gray Wolves: Return from Exile

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For the first time in seventy years, a Gray Wolf has been spotted in the Grand Canyon!

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Once the top predator throughout North America, humans hunted and drove the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) to the fringes of their natural range.  The species was nearly eliminated as a result of livestock attacks and a distorted perception of the wolves’ threat to people. By the 1960’s the Gray Wolf could on be found in preserves in two states and small regions in Canada.  Fortunately, increased understanding, protective measures, and reintroduction programs have allowed the canid’s population recover.

(The Gray Wolf seen at the Grand Canyon. Image Credit: Center for Biological Diversity)

Researchers are cautious about this lone sighting since the nearest breeding colony from whence he could come is roughly 1000 miles away.  Still, many hope this wolf’s appearance signals more to come as Gray wolves’ begin their return to their original habitat.

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Read more about the Gray Wolf’s past and present at IFL Science.

 

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Kristen E. Strubberg is the Editor-in-Chief for TGNR. Kristen founded TGNR in 2013 - seeking to create a high quality platform for original, eclectic and substantive positive news journalism by attracting expert contributors in many varying subjects. Kristen also works as a clinical medical researcher in Cardiology, with an original background in Neuroscience. Her passion for science has translated to her science-fiction specialization, with her highly adept published insights into the best of sci-fi’s popular culture. Kristen has served as TGNR’s Editor-in-Chief since 2013.

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