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Planets Align for Ziggy Stardust

With the recent passing of celebrated musician and performer David Bowie, the legend is now immortalized among the stars. Here is your guide to spotting his interstellar legacy, the upcoming planetary alignment, and Comet Catalina.

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Starting early the morning of January 20th through February 20th, the night sky will contain FIVE planets, and Comet Catalina to boot! Plus you can observe a very special treat: the newly designated constellation dedicated to the late David Bowie. So, how can you find Ziggy Stardust among the heavenly bodies above?

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Impending Planetary Alignment

All five planets – Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter – can be observed by the unaided eye, hence their designation as “bright planets” by astronomers. However, using binoculars, a stargazer might glimpse a few of Jupiter’s sixty-seven moons.

With a slightly higher powered telescope, one can observe the rings of Saturn as well. This power group of celestial lights has not made an appearance together since 2005.

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Comet Catalina Appears

Joining the visible planets is Comet Catalina, officially known as the less lyrical C/2013 US10.  Discovered in 2013 by it’s namesake observatory, scientists determined the comet most likely came from the icy Oort Cloud which encircles the outer reaches of the solar system.

The comet rocketed to 103,000 miles per hour after swooping around the sun. As such, this is most likely Comet Catalina’s only time ever in the inner solar system.

Comet Catalina will be close to the star Arcturus and can be seen with binoculars as a fuzzy glowing smudge.

Ziggy Stardust Emblazoned in the Cosmos

Last But NOT Least: In the same region of sky is a new constellation dedicated to David Bowie by Belgian scientists of the MIRA observatory and Studio Brussels. The seven stars form the iconic lightning bolt worn by Bowie’s Aladdin Sane.

The collaborators made sure the new constellation occurred in the region of Mars as a hat-tip to another Bowie incarnation: the aforementioned Ziggy Stardust.

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5 planets alignment, a comet and David BowieTGNR

Approximate Map of planets Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter in the sky from Jan. 20 to Feb. 20. Also plotted is Comet Catalina and Constellation Bowie consisting of stars Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis. (Image Credit: TGNR)

Approximate Map of planets Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter in the sky from Jan. 20 to Feb. 20. Also plotted is Comet Catalina and Constellation Bowie consisting of stars Sigma Librae, Spica, Alpha Virginis, Zeta Centauri, SAA 204 132, and Beta Sigma Octantis Trianguli Australis. (Image Credit: TGNR)

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David Bowie’s Date with Eternity

For the legacy of a man who was the living definition of stardom itself, there seems no better way to immortalize an icon who made immeasurable contributions to the culture of the 20th and 21st century. When looking to the sky above, TGNR salutes the late legend by helping identify his place in the sky a little easier for everyone.

Write to Kristen E. Strubberg at kstrubberg@tgnreview.com

References: EarthSky.org, CNN, NASA, The Guardian, and DDB.

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Kristen E. Strubberg is the Editor-in-Chief for TGNR. Kristen founded TGNR in 2013 - seeking to create a high quality platform for original, eclectic and substantive positive news journalism by attracting expert contributors in many varying subjects. Kristen also works as a clinical medical researcher in Cardiology, with an original background in Neuroscience. Her passion for science has translated to her science-fiction specialization, with her highly adept published insights into the best of sci-fi’s popular culture. Kristen has served as TGNR’s Editor-in-Chief since 2013.

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